Metro Atlanta’s first City Agriculture Planning Process

We all need room to grow, and our growers are running out of space. As metro Atlanta’s cities become more dense and developed, the long-term viability of community farms and gardens is threatened. We believe these farms and gardens strengthen the heart of our cities; they have a chance to thrive if local farmers and gardeners living and growing in metro Atlanta have a seat at the city planning table.


Cities that prioritize urban agriculture will:

  • Build resilient and equitable communities

  • Cultivate the health of residents

  • Promote the vitality of cities

Read more about our vision here.

City-Supported Agriculture. Community-Driven Planning.

We believe successful City Agriculture Plans are possible when cities and communities are equally engaged in the process. When municipal leaders and diverse community leaders plan together, everyone stands to benefit. The City Agriculture Plan will do exactly what its name says: bring growers, community leaders, and city officials together — guided by the planning expertise of the Atlanta Regional Commission — to develop city-wide plans that prioritize urban agriculture.

The end goal? Thriving community gardens and urban farms providing greater access to locally grown food across the metro Atlanta region, which translates to healthier people, environments, and communities.


Planning for a Healthier Future

Last fall, we put the call out to metro Atlanta cities asking who would like to join us to develop metro Atlanta’s first City Agriculture Plan and were thrilled with the response. Representatives from local cities submitted their interest, and the cities of Alpharetta, Clarkston, Hapeville, East Point, Lawrenceville, Lovejoy and Pine Lake helped host Community Food Forums for their residents and community stakeholders this February and March.

Working together, we got the word out, and brought awareness of local food to an entirely new level. Learn more about our City Agriculture Planning journey.


East Point Selected as Pilot City!

City of East Point Mayor Deana Holiday Ingraham signs the City Agriculture Plan MOU with Allison Duncan, Atlanta Regional Commission’s Principal Planner and Food Well Alliance’s Kim Karris, Executive Director, Will Sellers, Deputy Director and Sarah Benedict, Operations Coordinator.

City of East Point Mayor Deana Holiday Ingraham signs the City Agriculture Plan MOU with Allison Duncan, Atlanta Regional Commission’s Principal Planner and Food Well Alliance’s Kim Karris, Executive Director, Will Sellers, Deputy Director and Sarah Benedict, Operations Coordinator.

After a thorough exploration process with seven metro cities earlier this year, the City of East Point has been selected to pilot the new City Agriculture Plan. The plan will begin with a community engagement and asset mapping phase led by Food Well Alliance, followed by a six-month planning process undertaken with support from ARC. Once the plan is developed, Food Well Alliance will guide the implementation of the plan and provide a minimum of $75,000 in funding to help the community bring it to life.

The end goal? Thriving community gardens and urban farms providing greater access to locally grown food across the metro Atlanta Region, which translates to healthier people, environments, and communities. You can keep up-to-date with community engagement activities and ways to participate at www.foodwellalliance.org/east-point.


Funding for the City Agriculture Plan pilot initiative has been made possible by

The Zeist Foundation and the James M. Cox Foundation.


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